Fake Fishing

Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) have got stronger but counterfeits are pouring into Sri Lanka because rights holders don’t take action, say the experts. Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) have got stronger but counterfeits are pouring into Sri Lanka because rights holders don’t take action, say the experts. “Our Intellectual Property laws are on par with those of developed countries, but people are not interested,” said Dr. Harsha Cabral, Attorney-at-Law, explaining that not many individuals or companies made use of the improved legal system.

Intellectual Property includes patents, trademarks and copyrights, and once such a right is established, unauthorised reproductions are considered counterfeits, or illegal goods.

A comprehensive Intellectual Property Act, replaced the existing code last November, but it didn’t show a higher number of individuals coming forward to protect their rights.

What it did see was a burst of vigour on the part of the Sri Lanka Customs Department, who now feel free to act on their own initiative, when it comes to counterfeits.

“It is very much easier to copy rather than create,” pointed out Dr. Cabral, citi