Job Hunting

The International Labour Organisation says up to 20 percent of people who lost their livelihood after the tsunami, will switch to different jobs. The International Labour Organisation says up to 20 percent of people who lost their livelihood after the tsunami, will switch to different jobs.

“This could mean that thousands abandon their traditional way of life, most of all among fisher folk,” the ILO said, releasing its survey findings on Friday.

Tidal waves that swept Sri Lanka’s Northern, Eastern and Southern coastline washed away fishing villages, with 60 percent of the entire industry’s fleet damaged or destroyed.

Following the shock of the disaster, two thirds are still uncertain as to what their plans will be, with most saying they want to start a business.

Close upon 80 percent, largely women, hope to be self employed but many lack funds and 14 percent do not have the skills for what they plan to do.

The ILO says most will need small loans and advice on starting a business, while widows as new breadwinners may need grant aid to get on their feet.

“We have to make sure that that they are provided with urgently need