Putting It Up

The Ceylon Electricity Board is looking at ways of controlling Sri Lanka’s unruly street lamps that show disturbing tendencies of behaving like local politicians. The Ceylon Electricity Board is looking at ways of controlling Sri Lanka’s unruly street lamps that show disturbing tendencies of behaving like local politicians.

Sri Lanka’s political culture is rubbing off even on the country’s street lamps according to vexed CEB descriptions.

The similarities between local politicians and local street lamps, are quite striking.

For instance, according to exasperated CEB engineers, ‘they (the lamps) suddenly come up during election times.’

Once up, say CEB engineers, they are very difficult to remove, and most of them shouldn’t be up there in the first place anyway.

This is because the road lights have become another means of attracting votes when elections draw near.

The CEB says it cannot remove the illegal new entrants later because ‘ when we try to remove them the thugs try to beat us up.’

“Every election more lamps come up. These are not authorised by us. Around 40 percent of the lamps are unauthorised,” says Additional General M