Sorry Reverend

A second pre-poll survey by the Center for Policy Alternatives found that 64 per cent of Sri Lankans prefer the clergy out of politics, with only 27 per cent approving Reverend MPs.
The April polls will be the first occasion in Sri Lankan history where an organized group of saffron robbed monks enter the democratic political system and canvas for the public vote.rn

rnThe policies of the clergy contesting the Jathika Hela Urumaya banner sway heavily on protecting and promoting the Sinhala Buddhist heritage and value system.rn

rnOther key policies supported by the JHU include upholding Sinhala, the national language as the only official language and the Sinhala culture as the national culture while respecting the other non-Sinhala cultures (mainly Tamil and Muslim). rn

rnOn economic ground the saffron front vows to protect and develop the national economy focusing mainly on the upliftment of the Sinhalese and Sri Lankan people in general and to uphold the sovereignty of the people and social justic