The ‘Red’ Tape

From left: Dr. Fernando Im, Senior Country Economist for Sri Lanka and the Maldives, The World Bank, Hon. Eran Wickramaratne, State Minister, Ministry of Finance and Mass Media, Dr. W A Wijewardana, Former Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Sri Lanka, Prof. Indralal de Silva, Former (Chair) of Demography, University of Colombo, Prof. Amala de Silva, Department of Economics, University of Colombo at the panel discussion on "Demographic Change in Sri Lanka" moderated by Dr. Ramani Gunatilaka, International Centre for Ethnic Studies.

A fishing community in Kirinda, in Southern Sri Lanka, could lose their livelihood as their harbor is filling up with sand brought in by the tides. A fishing community in Kirinda, in Southern Sri Lanka, could lose their livelihood as their harbor is filling up with sand brought in by the tides. A dredger that used to clear the harbor entrance was beached by the Tsunami seven months ago.
Pulling the dredger back to the water has proved to be more complicated-not because of the process but because of the bureaucracy.

All was set on Wednesday last week to move the 200-ton dredger ‘Weligouwa’ a few yards towards the sea; eight months after the tsunami washed it ashore.

The dredger was working at Kirinda harbor mouth when the tsunami hit the southeastern coast moving the ship around 500 meters in shore.

With the dredger useless like a beached whale, the harbor mouth was getting narrower, making it difficult for multi-day fishing boats to enter the small fishing harbor.

Fishermen using the harbor asked the Yala village hotel, a luxury hotel nearby, to help move the dredger back in to the port using bulldozers and elep