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A new emergency rescue service deploying ambulances at call can save 30 percent of accident victims who die en-route to hospital in dangerous trishaw journeys. A new emergency rescue service deploying ambulances at call can save 30 percent of accident victims who die en-route to hospital in dangerous trishaw journeys.

Trishaws or three wheelers are the often the first and fastest at an accident, carrying as many as 52 percent of injured to hospitals for help and bystanders moving most others.

The lack of a proper ambulance network means just eight percent of injured are actually carried in ambulances to hospital, Chief Medical Officer of Health at the Colombo Municipal Council (CMC), Dr. Pradeep Kariyawasam, said.

The obvious lack of proper attention or healthcare in transporting victims by trishaws often results in severe debilitation or even death en-route.

“Narrow roads makes transport challenging but sometimes too much enthusiasm by the public also causes a worsening of the situation,” Kariyawasam said.

“We could save up to 30 percent of lives of patients transported to national hospitals or 300 people annually if they had proper care