Moving Over

The tsunami may have its effects on migration a year from now, as it leaves behind people – some displaced into cities, taking a keen look at work abroad. The tsunami may have its effects on migration a year from now, as it leaves behind people – some displaced into cities, taking a keen look at work abroad.

“This happens after major disasters, where displaced people or those who have lost their livelihoods sometimes move into neighboring towns, and soon start thinking of work opportunities maybe in the Gulf and other places,” Director General of the International Organisation for Migration, Brunson McKinley said.

“I think we will see this a year or two years from now, with more people thinking about overseas work as an option,” McKinley, on visit in Colombo, said on Tuesday.

Immediately, IOM’s Country Director for Sri Lanka Mary Sheehan says, it’s too soon to say what the impact of the tsunami will be on internal migration.

“People in camps are still rather disoriented and unsure about what to do with their lives,” Sheehan says.

Tidal waves that swept across eleven Asian countries last month, also killed over 30,000 people in Sri L