Connecting Bangladesh

Awarding the ISO 45001:2018 Certification

The SEA-ME-WE4 cable has landed in Bangladesh. This is great news. In this time of off-shoring and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), a country that is not connected to the outside world through optical fibre cable is at a tremendous disadvantage. Satellite connectivity is simply not enough for participation in the BPO business: the costs are too high; the latency is a problem in some cases; and the lack of redundancy is a deal breaker. The SEA-ME-WE4 cable has landed in Bangladesh. This is great news. In this time of off-shoring and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), a country that is not connected to the outside world through optical fibre cable is at a tremendous disadvantage. Satellite connectivity is simply not enough for participation in the BPO business: the costs are too high; the latency is a problem in some cases; and the lack of redundancy is a deal breaker. But a cable does not, by itself, do the job.

There are a whole series of nationally controllable conditions that have to be met for the promise of the cable to be realised.

To understand these, it is useful to look at Nigeria, a country that got connected to a submarine cable for the first time, like Bangladesh, just three years ago.

Why Nigeria? Why not Sri Lanka? Why not Pakistan? Both Pakistan and Sri Lanka were connected to submarine cables many years ago: SEA-ME-WE2 as well as SEA-ME-WE3.

The only non-landlocked South Asian countries that were not connect