Corporate leaders should use the moment to force the point that they are not a group of crony capitalists.

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremasinghe (2nd R) arrives to visit the site of a bomb attack at St. Anthony's Shrine in Kochchikade in Colombo on April 21, 2019. - A string of blasts ripped through high-end hotels and churches holding Easter services in Sri Lanka on April 21, killing at least 156 people, including 35 foreigners. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP) (Photo credit should read ISHARA S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Corporate leader activism is almost non-existent although the Cease Fire Agreement with the LTTE is delicately poised and political landscape slipping in to uncertainty. Corporate leader activism is almost non-existent although the Cease Fire Agreement with the LTTE is delicately poised and political landscape slipping in to uncertainty. The primacy of politics over economics is not uncommon in Sri Lanka but tends to hurt corporate profits that were boosted by peace moves in the last couple of years.

Critics argue that corporate leaders should use the moment to force the point that they are not a group of crony capitalists.

In a perfect world governments can be expected to build the environment for business and society to flourish.

Sri Lanka is not short of such wishful thinking.

Sri Lanka has had particularly bad time trying to shake off the primacy of politics over economics because of the ethnic issue, the cause of a war in the north and east.

The wartime growth is mediocre… at best.

Compare it to some of its neighbors and it can be even considered tragic.

India is a big country and has diverse opinions on economic policy.

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