Peep at P-TOMS, what they say

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremasinghe (2nd R) arrives to visit the site of a bomb attack at St. Anthony's Shrine in Kochchikade in Colombo on April 21, 2019. - A string of blasts ripped through high-end hotels and churches holding Easter services in Sri Lanka on April 21, killing at least 156 people, including 35 foreigners. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP) (Photo credit should read ISHARA S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)

P-TOMS will generate more than international goodwill for Sri Lanka, says the World Bank. P-TOMS will generate more than international goodwill for Sri Lanka, says the World Bank. “The existence of the mechanism would generate more support for Sri Lanka that would not have come in, in its absence,” said World Bank country head, Peter Harrold at an interview with Lanka Business Online.

The added support, says the World Bank, can come in the form of hard cash, attracted by the possibility of advancing a peace deal in a country that saw nearly 20 years of armed conflict.

“The peace process remains a hugely important factor as to why donors are interested in Sri Lanka,” says Harrold.

“They are willing to go the extra mile, if Sri Lanka wants to reconstruct in ways likely to support the peace process.”

The P-TOMS is also seen as a better tool for reconstruction because of its high community ownership.

“Now a lot of the assistance is externally driven,” explains Harrold
“but through this mechanism, communities themselves will bring forward their needs.”